paris je taime
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Reblogged from griseus  1 402 notes

griseus:

The spotted handfish (Brachionichthys hirsutus), an amazing creature that walks the ocean floor, is a rare Australian fish from the family Brachionichthyidae. It is classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List 2002. is the first Australian marine species to be threatened with extinction.

The greatest threats to the handfish appear to be siltation and invasive species. The Derwent Estuary where the fish lives is highly urbanised and industrialised, and a range of marine pests have been introduced through shipping.  One key pest is the Northern Pacific Seastar (Asterias amurensis), a particularly large and voracious predator that is now abundant in the estuary. Studies by CSIRO show that the seastars eat the stalked ascidians that the handfish use to attach their eggs.

Reblogged from centralparknyc  79 notes
centralparknyc:

A new report (detailed here) from Columbia University details how climate change may effect Central Park. The report says rising temperatures will be hard on our trees—especially the young and old—and on the organisms (both animal and vegetal) that live in our man made bodies of water, and it may make caring for our famous lawns ever more challenging.
But, there is an upside. Central Park is actually a useful tool in mitigating the effects of climate change. As long as we, the Central Park Conservancy, continue to support the Park’s biodiversity and keep our ecosystem healthy (a task we are deeply committed to), then the Park will continue to “increase its resilience to climate change, and make it a suitable habitat for more plants and animals.”
(via Studying climate change in Central Park | New York)

MY DREAMS

centralparknyc:

A new report (detailed here) from Columbia University details how climate change may effect Central Park. The report says rising temperatures will be hard on our trees—especially the young and old—and on the organisms (both animal and vegetal) that live in our man made bodies of water, and it may make caring for our famous lawns ever more challenging.

But, there is an upside. Central Park is actually a useful tool in mitigating the effects of climate change. As long as we, the Central Park Conservancy, continue to support the Park’s biodiversity and keep our ecosystem healthy (a task we are deeply committed to), then the Park will continue to “increase its resilience to climate change, and make it a suitable habitat for more plants and animals.”

(via Studying climate change in Central Park | New York)

MY DREAMS

Reblogged from griseus  1 402 notes

griseus:

The spotted handfish (Brachionichthys hirsutus), an amazing creature that walks the ocean floor, is a rare Australian fish from the family Brachionichthyidae. It is classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List 2002. is the first Australian marine species to be threatened with extinction.

The greatest threats to the handfish appear to be siltation and invasive species. The Derwent Estuary where the fish lives is highly urbanised and industrialised, and a range of marine pests have been introduced through shipping.  One key pest is the Northern Pacific Seastar (Asterias amurensis), a particularly large and voracious predator that is now abundant in the estuary. Studies by CSIRO show that the seastars eat the stalked ascidians that the handfish use to attach their eggs.

Reblogged from txchnologist  412 notes

txchnologist:

RFID Tags Show Elite Bees Are Made, Not Born

by Michael Keller

Some bees in a hive have a right to complain. Researchers studying individual foraging behavior found that a minority group of elite colony members work much harder than others. 

By attaching tiny radio frequency identification tags to the backs of bees, University of Illinois scientists realized that 20 percent of bees that leave the nest to forage account for 50 percent of the total food brought back.

“We found that some bees are working very, very hard – as we would have expected,” said lead researcher Gene Robinson, who heads the university’s Institute for Genomic Biology. “But then we found some other bees that were not working as hard as the others.”

Read more and check out the video below.

Read More

Reblogged from libutron  208 notes
libutron:

Blue buttons have antimicrobial properties
The so called Blue button looks like a jellyfish but it isn’t, well isn’t even a single organism, but a colony of hydroids scientifically named Porpita porpita (Anthoathecata - Porpitidae). 
Results of a study to check the antimicrobial properties of these sea organisms, published in 2010 in the Middle-East Journal of Scientific Research, indicate that extract of the central disc region of Porpita porpita exhibits activity against both bacterial (gram-positive and gram-negative) and fungal strains. The maximum antibacterial inhibition was recorded in Klebsiella pneumonia and the maximum antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger.
These yet preliminary analyses show that the Blue button, beside being beautiful, contains antimicrobial peptides, which might prove to be of high use in the pharmaceutical industry as a component of antibiotics. 
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Mozambique

libutron:

Blue buttons have antimicrobial properties

The so called Blue button looks like a jellyfish but it isn’t, well isn’t even a single organism, but a colony of hydroids scientifically named Porpita porpita (Anthoathecata - Porpitidae)

Results of a study to check the antimicrobial properties of these sea organisms, published in 2010 in the Middle-East Journal of Scientific Research, indicate that extract of the central disc region of Porpita porpita exhibits activity against both bacterial (gram-positive and gram-negative) and fungal strains. The maximum antibacterial inhibition was recorded in Klebsiella pneumonia and the maximum antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger.

These yet preliminary analyses show that the Blue button, beside being beautiful, contains antimicrobial peptides, which might prove to be of high use in the pharmaceutical industry as a component of antibiotics. 

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Bjørn Christian Tørrissen | Locality: Mozambique

Reblogged from ucresearch  684 notes

ucresearch:

How diamonds and lasers can recreate Jupiter’s core


Understanding what the insides of the biggest planets in the universe has been largely wrapped up in theories.  Now scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Lab have recreated these conditions with the help of diamonds and the world’s largest laser:

Though diamond is the least compressible material known, the researchers were able to compress it to an unprecedented density, greater than lead at ambient conditions.

The hope is to understand how these planets evolve over time by being able to reproduce their immense pressures.  You can read more about it here.

Reblogged from mucholderthen  114 notes

mucholderthen:

Mutated, drug-resistant bacteria lurk in the peaceful British countryside
Sewage-treatment plants described as giant ‘mixing vessels’
after scientists discover mutated microbes in British river

Exclusive to The Independent, 19 July 2014 (by Steve Connor)

Superbugs resistant to some of the most powerful antibiotics in the medical arsenal have been found for the first time in a British river – with scientists pinpointing a local sewage-treatment plant as the most likely source.

Scientists discovered the drug-resistant bacteria in sediment samples taken downstream of the sewerage plant on the River Sowe near Coventry. The microbes contained mutated genes that confer resistance to the latest generation of antibiotics.

The researchers believe the discovery shows how antibiotic resistance has become widespread in the environment, with sewage-treatment plants now acting as giant “mixing vessels” where antibiotic resistance can spread between different microbes.

A study found that a wide range of microbes living in the river had acquired a genetic mutation that is known to provide resistance to third-generation cephalosporins, a class of antibiotics used widely to treat meningitis, blood infections and other hospital-acquired infections.

Read more …

Copyright by The Independent, all rights reserved.